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Wine Tasting in a New Light

A new way to experience wine   Pulsar are proud to have helped once again with the annual E-luminate festival in Cambridge. Taking place at the popular Hotel du Vin restaurant, the E-luminate wine tasting event is a uniquely colourful experience. Visitors sample different wines, each with a complimentary lighting scheme. Pulsar’s Snowy Johnson programmed the fixtures for the event. The lights are configured remotely via RDM and using a Pharos system to intelligently pick or play back preset looks. Our Luxeos 18 floodlights provided illumination for the event, complete with version 2.0 electronics… More information on that coming soon! The E-Luminate festival is packed with fantastic installations and events and takes place until the 14th February. To find out more about the festival and the events taking place over the next few days, follow the link

Pulsar Lights Pulsar

Pulsar UniBay Luminaires Installed at New Cambridge Factory   When we moved into our new building, one of the main challenges we faced was the lighting. The decrepit metal halide luminaires in the factory were only producing around 10 to 50 Lux - far from ideal. Putting in Pulsar UniBay luminaires, our LED high bays, has improved the light levels to over 300 lux, which is perfect for identifying small components. It also makes for far more comfortable and safer working conditions. The Pulsar UniBay is designed to produce over 15,000 lumens with high quality colour rendering. It's also designed to be easy to install in a wide range of different situations. To learn more about the UniBay, click the image below: At less than half the power, the UniBays provide substantial energy savings too, and are far better for the environment. If you'd like to visit Pulsar and see these lights in action, or to learn more about how Pulsar lights can benefit your business, please

Students Create Dramatic Lighting at Caerphilly Castle

Caerphilly Castle - Illuminating an Iconic Structure   Lighting Design students at the University of South Wales caused a stir on the 17th & 18th November, by illuminating the stunning exterior of Caerphilly Castle.   The exciting lighting display ran alongside CADW film nights, which take place at the castle annually.  The event provides a unique opportunity for students of the university to plan and execute a large-scale lighting project. The brief from CADW was to create a gothic feel with lots of imagery, and a focus on the colour red. To achieve this, the students planned to light the front of the castle in red, and to use custom gobos, and specific lighting states, to complement each film. The students used a range of lighting equipment to bring this vision to life, including Pulsar ChromaStrip 25 linear fixtures. Lighting student Josh Hill described the approach taken by the team. ‘Each film had its own state with unique colours to accent the text. We

5 Key Considerations for any Architectural Installation

  5 Key Considerations for Any Architectural Lighting Project 1.  Aesthetics The most important aspect of any architectural lighting project is aesthetics; this is why you’re installing lights in the first place, right? Modern LED fixtures such as the Pulsar Luxeos range offer a massive colour palette, and a plethora of different effects can be achieved. However, you don’t have to use everything at once. Exiting colour effects that look stunning on a piece of modern architecture may look gaudy on a heritage building façade. White light doesn’t have to be static; Pulsar’s Vibrant White Luxeos range can create any colour temperature from warm candlelight to tungsten to clear daylight, and anything in between. Dynamically changing colour temperature creates an effect that’s both subtle and interesting. Similarly, the custom RGBW light engines of the Vivid Colour range can create all manner of mixed colours, from bold saturated shades to more subtle pastel hues,

Colour Rendering – Crucial but often misunderstood

Colour Rendering - Explained Colour rendition is a crucial but often misunderstood aspect of any lighting installation. There are a few methods of measuring colour rendering, including TM-30, the Colour Quality Scale (CQS) and others, but this article will focus on the Colour Rendering Index (CRI) as this venerable system is still by far the most commonly used. What is colour rendering? Put simply, colour rendering is a measure of how accurate the colour of objects illuminated appears to be, when compared to a reference source. Things illuminated with a high CRI light source can be expected to look very similar to how they would in daylight, for example. What colour rendering doesn’t do is tell you anything about the colour of a light source; that’s instead determined by the colour temperature (CCT). It also doesn’t tell you the range of colours that can be seen under the light source- something known as the gamut area. How does CRI work? CRI is based on a set