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LED Colour Mixing Explained

LED Colour Mixing Explained  LEDs have had a long association with colour, from the advent of visible spectrum red LEDs in the early 1960’s to the ground breaking development of the blue LED by Shuji Nakamura. As soon as blue LEDs became commercially available, lighting manufacturers like Pulsar started to experiment with colour mixing, creating a vast palette of colours from a few carefully chosen light sources. Fast forward to the present day, and LED colour mixing has become the standard for architectural and stage lighting. So why are LEDs so effective at colour mixing? Most light sources produce a broad spectrum of light which has to be filtered out to make specific colours, whereas LEDs are very efficient at making precise specific colours directly from the source. Adding these colours together rather than having to remove large portions of the light spectrum is far more energy efficient, controllable and convenient. Simply by changing the levels of each LED, a massive

Flying Scotsman rests with Luxeos

The Challenge Pulsar was presented with the pleasant challenge of illuminating the Flying Scotsman to create a dramatic and atmospheric effect on its return to The National Railway Museum. The bill was to be ensure "bright and of ultra high quality for photography, as well as being unobtrusive". The task was made increasingly difficult as the lighting had to be set up and packed away each evening with only a 30 minute window to do so. Choice of light The solution needed a large amount of light in the right place to be successful. Any large object, such as the Flying Scotsman in its painted livery, effectively absorbs light. i.e. light reflects and bounces all over the place, reducing the impact of what you (and your eye see). The fixtures used needed to by substantial enough to withstand knocks, bangs, kicks and moving in and out each night. With all this in mind, fixtures also must be 100% reliable and configured to operate in exactly the same way each time it was

Lighting the Locomotives – National Railway Museum

Lighting the Locomotives is a Teamwork Triumph at National Railway Museum The Great Hall at the National Railway Museum at York was the singularly impressive location for the 7th annual ‘Locos in a Different Light’ competition. Sponsored jointly by Ambersphere Solutions and Pulsar Light of Cambridge, the aim is to challenge six teams of students from different colleges across the UK who are studying technical lighting at Further and Higher education levels, to each light one of the iconic locomotives in the Museum’s Great Hall. Each team is given a selection of lighting fixtures, an MA dot2 console and two hours to rig and programme their chosen design. Even for those not smitten by the sight and smell of these gigantic engines, there can be no doubting the very real challenge of successfully illuminating one of these heaving beasts of yesteryear. With a limited number of fixtures and with some of the locomotives up to sixty metres in length, not to mention being a 3600 canvas

Eluminate Festival England

Colour your City with Light

“Colour Your City with Light” For the fourth year running Pulsar Light is proud to be a part of e-Luminate Festival Cambridge 2016. Last year’s event saw Pulsar illuminating the Fitzwilliam Museum with great effect. This year, Pulsar's very own Snowy Johnson in collaboration with lighting designer Susie Olczak had the task of illuminating the Senate House and the adjacent Old Schools with the installation being handled by Hawthorn. Susie’s brief was to create a light experience, which the public could interact with whilst viewing the impressive Senate House. This was achieved by creating environment chases and linking them to a control panel which allowed passers by to engage in the spectacle and feel even more a part of the festival of light. Susie created a low energy interactive light installation using Pulsar equipment to illuminate the façade of Senate House. This interactive installation used complementary colours while challenging the audience to make choices