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e-Luminate Festival 2016

e-Luminate Cambridge Festival returns 12th February – 17th February 2016   Pulsar are proud to support and sponsor e-Luminate Festival of Cambridge for the 4th year running. During six exceptional evenings, the e-Luminate Cambridge Festival, will offer the public a unique spectacle creating ephemeral light art installations in the richness and diversity of the urban landscape, and completely transforming the city. From all over the city, the region and around the world, visitors are invited to discover Cambridge in a new light. e-Luminate Cambridge is the city’s most innovative arts festival showcasing breathtaking light installations created by artists, designers and technologists. The great thing  about light is that it is a medium accessible to all, no prior knowledge of the arts or sciences is needed to enjoy this amazing event! Information links below: e-Luminate Cambridge    @eluminatefest    2015Gallery      #lovelight2016     

Pulsar proud to be a part of Lightscape Exhibition – Houghton Hall

Houghton Hall, Norfolk - The James Turrell Lightscape Exhibition In 2015, Houghton Hall, Norfolk hosted an ambitious and important exhibition - The James Turrell Lightscape Exhibition. Pulsar were extremely proud to be a part of  this spectacular event. ★ ★ ★ ★ “Turrell… is a magician” The Telegraph For a detailed insight in to the The James Turrell Lightscape Exhibition, please click the link   Built in the 1720s for Great Britain’s first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, Houghton Hall remains one of England’s finest Palladian houses. Houghton Hall is open to the public and can be visited from the 1st May 2016. Their is so much to see at Houghton Hall from their impressive collection of sculptures, the walled gardens and park, including its unusual herd of white fallow deer. Take a look for yourself Photo credited to : Pete

Light Experiment with e-Luminate

In October 2015, the e-Luminate Foundation team invited distinguished guests to take part in an experiment to prove whether lighting conditions influence our perception of wine. Recreating a 2009 German experiment reported in the Journal of Sensory Perception, e-Luminate worked with the Cambridgeshire Wine School to create an immersive sensory experience for all. The wines were kindly sponsored by Bosca (www.bosca.it), whilst the lighting effects were provided by Pulsar (www.pulsarlight.com). We are very grateful to bot for their contribution. A special thanks to Gonville and Caius College (www.cai.cam.ac.uk) for giving us access to the stunning Fellows' Dining Room to run this unique event. Click ( HERE ) to watch a short video online. To find out more about this and other events please visit our website at

Holy Trinity Church standing tall amongst the features of the night sky..

Holy Trinity Church, Blythburgh, Suffolk Is known locally as “The Cathedral of the Marshes” and it stands tall, visible for miles from the A12 trunk road. Like many other Churches, Holy Trinity relies on carefully designed external lighting to make its flint decorated architecture a local landmark by night as well as by day. A warm colour rendering, minimal light pollution and restricted glare were inherent factors in the design brief of this relighting project, which covered every elevation of this wonderful building. Following a successful re-lighting of St Peter & St Paul, Wangford, which is in the same group of parishes, the design and installation team of James Laws and Boggis Electrical of Wrentham was chosen by Blythburgh PCC to re-light Holy Trinity. They selected Pulsar Light Eco-Range floods for both projects. Holy Trinity Church was previously lit externally with a variety of sodium and other discharge fittings, with an estimated total power consumption of

Wine tasting on a light note..

e-Luminate Wine Tasting Experiment. Last week the e-Luminate Cambridge Festival team organised a most unusual experiment to explore whether lighting conditions influence our perceptions. The experiment consisted in tasting wine under different lights in the prestigious Fellows ‘Dining Room at Gonville & Caius College. With e-Luminate being in the business of light not wine, the team engage the services of Mark Anstead from the Cambridgeshire Wine School to host the evening. David Cleevely, Chairman of Cambridge Wireless and Raspberry Pi, said "It was a brilliant evening, very entertaining and an great opportunity to find out more about the work the e-Luminate Foundation does in Cambridge through their educational programme and the light festival " Guests, enjoyed a selection of Italian sparkling wines by Bosca, whose cellars are UNESCO World Heritage Site. The spectacular and immersive lighting effects were achieved using products by Pulsar Light, a local

Top Five Advantages of LED Lighting

Top Five Advantages of LED Lighting Efficiency - We’ve all heard about the energy efficiency of LED lights, but what’s the real story? Compared with fluorescent and metal halide, well designed LED lights will typically use between half and one quarter of the power to achieve the same light output. Compared to halogen or tungsten, the savings are even greater. Whilst it’s true that light emitting diodes are fantastically efficient light sources, the light fixtures need to be properly designed to maximise this efficiency without damaging the LED itself and degrading its light output over time. Lifetime - LED Fixtures last many times longer than their traditional counterparts, removing the cost, downtime and inconvenience of having to hire access equipment and purchase of new lamps. The long lifetime of LED products really comes into its own when considering difficult to access areas, such as the roofs of factories, warehouses and hangars, and for decorative architectural

Colour Rendering – Crucial but often misunderstood

Colour Rendering - Explained Colour rendition is a crucial but often misunderstood aspect of any lighting installation. There are a few methods of measuring colour rendering, including TM-30, the Colour Quality Scale (CQS) and others, but this article will focus on the Colour Rendering Index (CRI) as this venerable system is still by far the most commonly used. What is colour rendering? Put simply, colour rendering is a measure of how accurate the colour of objects illuminated appears to be, when compared to a reference source. Things illuminated with a high CRI light source can be expected to look very similar to how they would in daylight, for example. What colour rendering doesn’t do is tell you anything about the colour of a light source; that’s instead determined by the colour temperature (CCT). It also doesn’t tell you the range of colours that can be seen under the light source- something known as the gamut area. How does CRI work? CRI is based on a set